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Save Point Lookout Headland
Straddie

Save Point Lookout Headland

SAVE POINT LOOKOUT HEADLAND FROM THE PLANNED WHALE SKELETON BUILDING

Saving the iconic Point Lookout Headland from a whale skeleton building is symbolic of the struggle to save Straddie from becoming an over-crowded international tourist destination, and from large scale development.

The State Government’s $4.6 Million plan to construct a building to house a whale skeleton on the magnificent, unspoilt Point Lookout Headland, is part of the Government’s misdirected, tourism focused Economic Transition Strategy or ETS.

The Save the Headland petition opposes building on the Headland. It has over 38,000 signatures so far – indigenous and non-indigenous residents, business owners, ratepayers and Straddie lovers.

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On February 1, 2021, over 200 people attended the smoking ceremony at the Quandamooka Truth Embassy

On 31 January, 2021 indigenous residents established the Quandamooka Truth Embassy on the site to prevent the scheduled construction commencing.

To follow the Truth Embassy’s progress and to read the initial media release, see https://www.facebook.com/SaveStraddie2020/

The Headland is part of the Point Lookout Public Reserve, declared in 1957, for “scenic and recreation purposes”. The area also was heritage listed in 2004 by the State Government, partly because of its “social, cultural and spiritual” importance to Aboriginal people. It should be no surprise some indigenous people regard the Headland as akin to a sacred site. Incredibly, the State Government so far has ignored this.

In 2011 the Federal Court recognised non-exclusive native title rights and interests over the Public Reserve. This means the general public’s interests and native title interests co-exist. This helps to explain why saving the Headland from a building is not a race issue, as one or two politicians mischievously have claimed. Saving the Headland, and the Quandamooka Truth Embassy, are widely supported by indigenous and non-indigenous residents.

A short history and summary, including the undemocratic planning process and decision making used by the State Government, may be read here.